In the last six years, New York State has lost more people than any other state. This despite leading the nation in the number of foreign immigrants and births. That could have a negative impact on local residents.

New York's large population gave its representatives in Congress power and influence, but as the population continues to shift from New York to other states, could that undermine the state's ability to win in Washington?

In the last six years, New York State has lost more people than any other state. This despite leading the nation in the number of foreign immigrants and births. That could have a negative impact on local residents.

Among those who might be moving is Denise Herr. She is a graduate student studying toxicology at the University of Rochester. While she likes Rochester, she doesn't know if she'll be able to settle here.

"I guess it depends a lot on the economy when I graduate," she says, "It would be nice to stay around in this area because I have made a lot of friends and contacts in this community, but it also depends on where I find a job."

Jobs may be a part of the reason that from July 2015 to July 2016, New York lost 191,367 people to other states. Watchdog think tank Empire Center estimates that it is the first population decline in a decade, and the largest since 2007.

One Rochester native and U of R sophomore says she won't be staying after graduation:

"I just want to leave the city because there's actually no law school here, so I wouldn't be able to get an education in law over here. So I do need to distance myself, but also to gain experience. I definitely need to see the world and see what else is around me."

So what does that mean for New York when people move out of NY? Kent Gardner is the chief economist with the Center for Governmental Research. He says population losses mean lost seats in Congress, and programs are determined by formulas created by Congress.

"But not only that," says Gardner, "but there are programs that are not divided by formula at all, its just how much 'oomph' you have in Congress. So to the extent we lose Congressional representatives, we lose some power."

Gardner says Superstorm Sandy is an example.

"How money was allocated by the Congress after Superstorm Sandy. A lot of that was determined by the power of the NY and NJ delegations! They had a lot to say about how much money Congress appropriated... the same is probably true of 9/11."

To put the loss of representatives in Congress in perspective, in 1953, New York had 45 representatives... but today there are 27. That decline was due to the loss of population.