Seligman announced Thursday that 42 of the schools' public safety officers will be armed. Four of them are senior officers including the chief and deputy chief. The other 38 are officers assigned primarily to the medical center, where the concern is greatest.

The president of the University of Rochester announced that public safety officers in the emergency room will carry weapons.

A report released in September recommended arming a number of officers at Strong Memorial Hospital. The report came from the University Security Commission.

Many of the university's armed officers will be assigned to the emergency department and other areas in the medical center where faculty, staff and students report being threatened and say they don't feel safe.

"We do believe that the campus is very safe, but the kidnapping of two of our students last December was a very important wake up call," says UR President Joel Seligman.

Seligman announced Thursday that 42 of the schools' public safety officers will be armed. Four of them are senior officers including the chief and deputy chief. The other 38 are officers assigned primarily to the medical center, where the concern is greatest.

"Working here and seeing a lot of patients and patients’ families," says Seligman. "There are great people then you see the other side that people that have anger problems. I'm happy they've got that ability to be armed and trained."

From 2013 to 2015, Seligman says the university confiscated on average between 230 knives, eight guns and 33 other weapons each year.

"Guns unfortunately have had to be selected because of the effectiveness of the deterrent," says Seligman. "It's not the use of the guns, that's the last thing we want to do, but it's to prevent others from using weapons and try to make the sense of safety as great a reality at the University of Rochester as we can."

But while workers at the medical center want an extra level of security, campus minority organizations overwhelmingly oppose arming officers on the River Campus.

"They have to go through training and make sure nothing like Ferguson, or like Baltimore or around the country happens," says sophomore Raymond Yu.

Seligman says this will not happen quickly. He promises officers will go through rigorous training which will include training in bias and diversity and how to de-escalate confrontations without using weapons.

He also wants a public safety review board in place to scrutinize any and all incidents involving the use of a weapon.

The full statement is available here.